Contribute to CDG’s AI Collection!

By Tiiu Daniel, Web Archive Leading Specialist, National Library of Estonia

“Trurl” by Daniel Mróz, from The Cyberiad by Stanisław Lem (Wydawnictwo Literackie, Kraków, 1972). Illustration copyright © 1972 Daniel Mróz. Reprinted by permission.

After significant breakthroughs at the end of the 20th and at the beginning of 21st centuries, artificial intelligence (AI) has played a greater role in our daily lives. Although AI has a huge positive impact on a variety of fields such as manufacturing, healthcare, art, transportation, retail and so on, the use of new technologies also raises ethical issues as well as security risks. One critical and hotly debated issue is the impact of ongoing automation on labor markets, to include changing educational requirements for jobs, job elimination, and various models for transitions.

The IIPC Content Development Group invites curators and web archivists around the world to contribute websites to a new “Artificial Intelligence” web collection.

The purpose of this collection is to bring together and record web content related to use of AI and its impact on any possible aspect of life, reflecting attitudes and thoughts towards it, future predictions etc.

The content can be in any language focusing on specific countries or cultures or have a global scope.

We especially welcome contributions from underrepresented countries, cultures, languages and other groups, or those countries without IIPC members. Curators currently building AI related collections at their own institutions are welcome to contribute their seeds (matching below criteria) to aid in the development of a collection with an international perspective.

The collection aims to cover the following subtopics:

  • Machine learning, natural language processing, robotics, automation;
  • AI in literature, visual arts (e.g. ceramics, drawing, painting, sculpture, design, photography, filmmaking, architecture) and performing arts (e.g. theater, public speech, dance, music etc.); AI in emerging art forms;
  • AI and law/legislation;
  • Social and economic impact (e.g. impact on behavior/interaction, bias in AI, unemployment, inequality, changes in labor markets);
  • Ethical issues (e.g. weaponization of AI, security, robot rights);
  • Future predictions/scenarios concerning AI.

Types of web content to include are personal forms such as blogs, forum posts, and artist websites; trend reports, statements, and analyses (i.e. from government agencies, NGOs, scientific or academic institutions, advocacy groups, businesses).

Time frame covered by content: from the 1990s onwards.

Out of scope are: full social media feeds and channels (Facebook, twitter, Instagram, YouTube, WhatsApp), user’ video channels (YouTube, Vimeo), apps and other content which is difficult or impossible to crawl.

That said, if you locate individual social media posts of unique value, such as an Instagram post by a bot or a particularly relevant and ephemeral individual video, please submit them for consideration.

Nominations are welcomed using the following form.

The call for nominations will close on the 30th of June 2019. Crawls will be run during the summer 2019. Collection will be made available at the end of 2019.

 For more information about this collection, contact Tiiu Daniel (tiiu.daniel[at]nlib.ee).


Lead-Curators of CDG Artificial Intelligence Collection
Tiiu Daniel, Web Archive Leading Specialist, National Library of Estonia
Liisi Esse, Ph.D. Associate Curator for Estonian and Baltic Studies Stanford University Libraries
Rashi Joshi, Reference Librarian /Collections Specialist, Library of Congress

CDG Co-Chairs
Nicola Bingham, Lead Curator Web Archiving, British Library
Alex Thurman, Web Resources Collection Coordinator, Columbia University Libraries

Contribute to CDG’s Climate Change Collection!

By Kees Teszelszky, Curator Digital Collections, Koninklijke Bibliotheek – National Library of The Netherlands and Lead Curator, CDG Climate Change Collection

Climate change is one of the most urgent and hotly debated issues on the web in recent years. The IIPC Content Development Group is inviting all curators and web archivists from around the world to contribute websites to a new collaborative “Climate Change” collection.

Breiðamerkurlón
Breiðamerkurlón, Iceland

In recent decades there is has been strong evidence that the earth is experiencing rapid climate change, characterized by global temperature rise, warming oceans, shrinking ice sheets, glacial retreat, decreased snow cover, sea level rise, declining arctic sea ice, extreme weather events, and ocean acidification. Ninety-seven percent of climate scientists agree that these climate-warming trends over the past century are very likely due to human activities, and most of the leading scientific organizations worldwide have issued public statements endorsing this position (source: climate.nasa.gov/evidence). Global and local action to mitigate this crisis has been complicated by political, economic, technical, cultural, and religious debates.

Many people feel the urge to reflect on this topic on the web. We would like to take an international snapshot of born digital culture relating to documentation of and social debate on the challenging issue of climate change. You can contribute to this collection by nominating web content about any aspect of climate change, and the content can be focused on specific countries or cultures or have a global focus, and can be in any language.

We especially welcome contributions from underrepresented countries, cultures, languages and other groups, or those countries without IIPC members. Curators currently building climate change related collections at their own institutions are welcome to contribute their seeds (matching below criteria) to help us build a collection with an international perspective.

Examples of subtopics might include climatology, climate change denial, climate refugees, religious reflections on climate change, etc. Eligible types of web content include organizational reports or statements (i.e. from government agencies, NGOs, scientific or academic institutions, advocacy groups, political parties/platforms, businesses, religious groups) or more personal forms such as blogs or artistic projects.

Out of scope are: social media feeds (Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube channels, WhatsApp), video (YouTube, Vimeo), apps and other content which is difficult or impossible to crawl.

Collecting seeds started on 1 April 2019 and more nominations can be added to this spreadsheet. Crawls will be run during the summer of 2019, to conclude shortly after the upcoming UN Climate Action Summit on 23 September 2019.

Organized by the IIPC and supported by web archivists around the world, the special web collection ‘Climate Change’ is one of the ways the IIPC helps raise awareness of the strategic, cultural and technological issues which make up the web archiving and digital preservation challenge.

For more information about this collection contact Kees Teszelszky for more details: kees.teszelszky[at]kb.nl

IIPC Content Development Group: 2019 collections

By Nicola Bingham, Lead Curator Web Archiving, British Library and Co-Chair of the Content Development Working Group

During 2019, the Content Development Group (CDG) will continue to work on several established collections: 

New for 2019, the CDG is undertaking a Climate Change Collection, led by Kees Teszelszky of  the National Library of the Netherlands. The first crawl will take place before the General Assembly & the Web Archiving Conference in June, with a final crawl shortly after the next UN Climate summit in September. This collection has sparked a lot of interest on the CDG mailing list and many curators have expressed an interest in contributing.

We are also planning an Artificial Intelligence Collection, led by Tiiu Daniel of the National Library of Estonia, Liisi Esse of Stanford University Libraries and Rashi Joshi of Library of Congress. The details are still to be firmed up.

We are planning to crawl one of our collections, or a subset of a collection, in order that it can be used by researchers.

Collaborate to develop web archive collections with Cobweb!

By Kathryn Stine, Manager, Digital Content Development and Strategy at the California Digital Library

Cobweb is a recently launched collaborative collection development platform for web archives, now available for anyone to use to establish and participate in web archiving collecting projects at https://cobwebarchive.org. A cross-institutional team from UCLA, the California Digital Library (CDL), and Harvard University has developed Cobweb, which was made possible in part by funding from the United States Institute for Museum and Library Services and initially hosted by CDL. We’ve been encouraged by the enthusiasm and engagement that’s met Cobweb and look forward to supporting a range of collaborative and coordinated web archiving collecting projects with this new platform.

Peter Broadwell & Kathryn Stine introducing CobWeb at the Web Archiving Conference in Wellington (slides).

At the 2018 IIPC Web Archiving Conference in New Zealand, Cobweb tutorial attendees played with Cobweb functionality and provided useful feedback and ideas for platform refinements and future feature options. Thank you to all who have shared their suggestions for advancing Cobweb! A number of demonstration projects are now on the platform that showcase how Cobweb supports web archiving collection development activities, including nominating web resources to a project and claiming intentions for, and following through with, archiving nominated web content. Additionally, the extensive Archive of the California Government Domain (CA.gov) has been established as a Cobweb collecting project and the CA.gov team is considering how to integrate Cobweb into its collection development workflows.

Cobweb centralizes the often distributed activities that go into developing web archive collections, allowing for multiple contributors and organizations to work together towards realizing common collecting goals. The coordinated activities that result in rich, useful web archive collections can draw upon distinct areas of expertise or capacity including subject specialization, technical facility with content capture, and resources for storing and managing content. The Cobweb platform is well-suited to supporting curated and crowdsourced collection building, from complex, multi-partner initiatives to local efforts that require coordination, such as that between digital archivists and library subject selectors.

If you have web archiving collecting goals that can benefit from engaging in collaborative and/or coordinated participation, learn more about getting started with Cobweb by visiting https://cobwebarchive.org/getting_started, checking out the Cobweb presentation from the IIPC WAC, or by emailing cobwebarchive[at]gmail.com.