2016 IIPC General Assembly & Web Archiving Conference

In 2016 the IIPC is organising two back-to-back events in the spring hosted by the Landsbókasafn Íslands – Háskólabókasafn (National and University Library of Iceland) in Reykjavík, Iceland:

  • IIPC General Assembly 2016, 11-12 April – Free (open for members only)
  • IIPC Web Archiving Conference 2016, 13-15 April – Free (open to anyone)

The IIPC is seeking proposals for presentations and workshops for the 2016 IIPC Web Archiving Conference (13 – 15 April 2016). Members of the IIPC are also encouraged to submit proposals for the IIPC General Assembly (11 & 12 April 2016).

Theme guidance

Proposals may cover any aspect of web archiving. The following is a non-exhaustive list of possible topics:

Policy and Practice

  • Harvesting, preservation, and/or access
  • Collection development
  • Copyright and privacy
  • Legal and ethical concerns
  • Programmatic organization and management

Research

  • Research using web archives
  • Tools and approaches
  • Initiatives, platforms, and collaborations

Tools

  • New/updated tools for any part of the lifecycle
  • Application programming interfaces (APIs)
  • Current and future landscape

Proposal guidance

Individual presentations can be a maximum of 20 mins. A panel session can be a maximum of 60 minutes with 2 or more presentations on a topic. A discussion session should include one or more introductory statements followed by a moderated discussion. Workshops can be up to a half-day in length; please include details on the proposed structure, content, and target audience.

Abstracts should include the name of the speaker(s), a title, theme and be no more than 300 words. All abstracts should be in English.

Please submit your proposals using this form. For questions, please e-mail iipc@bl.uk .

The deadline for submissions is 17 December 2015. All submissions will be reviewed by the Programme Committee and submitters will be notified by mid-January 2016.

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Five Takeaways from AOIR 2015

aoirI recently attended the annual Association of Internet Researchers (AOIR) conference in
Phoenix, AZ. It was a great conference that I would highly recommend to anyone interested in learning first hand about research questions, methods, and studies broadly related to the Internet.

Researchers presented on a wide range of topics, across a wide range of media, using both qualitative and quantitative methods. You can get an idea of the range of topics by looking at the conference schedule.

I’d like to briefly share some of my key takeaways. I apologize in advance for oversimplifying what was a rich and deep array of research work, my goal here is to provide a quick summary and not an in-depth review of the conference.

  1. Digital Methods Are Where It’s At

I attended an all-day, pre-conference digital methods workshop. As a testament to the interest in this subject, the workshop was so overbooked they had to run three concurrent sessions. The workshops were organized by Axel Bruns, Jean Burgess, Tim Highfield, Ben Light, and Patrik Wikstrom (Queensland University of Technology), and Tama Leaver (Curtin University).

Researchers are recognizing that digital research skills are essential. And, if you have some basic coding knowledge, all the better.

At the digital methods workshop, we learned about the “Walkthrough” method for studying software apps, tools for “web scraping” to gather data for analysis, Tableau to conduct social media analysis, and “instagrammatics,” analyzing Instagram.

FYI: The Digital Methods Initiative from Europe has tons of great information, including an amazing list of tools.

  1. Twitter API Is also Very Popular

There were many Twitter studies, and they all used the Twitter API to download tweets for analysis. Although researchers are widely using the Twitter API, they expressed a lot of frustration over its limitation. For example, you can only download for free up to 1% of the total Twitter volume. If you’re studying something obscure, you are probably okay, but if you’re studying a topic like #jesuischarlie, you’ll have to pay to get the entire output. Many researchers don’t have the funds for that. One person pointed out that it would be ideal to have access to the Library of Congress’s Twitter archive. Yes, agreed!

  1. Social Media over Web Archives

Researchers presented conclusions and provided commentary on our social behavior through studies of social media such as Snapchat, Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. There were only a handful of presentations using web archived materials. If a researcher used websites, they viewed them live or conducted “web scraping” with tools such as Outwit and Kimono. Many also used custom Python scripts to gather the data from the sites.

  1. Fair Use Needs a PR Movement

There’s still much misunderstanding about what researchers can and cannot do with digital materials. I attended a session where the presenter shared findings from surveys conducted with communication scholars about their knowledge of fair use. The results showed that there was (very!) limited understanding of fair use. Even worse, the findings showed that those scholars who had previously attended a fair use workshop were even more unlikely to understand fair use! Moreover, many admitted that they did not conduct particular studies because of a (misguided) fear of violating copyright. These findings were corroborated by the scholars from a variety of fields who were in the room.

  1. Opportunities for Collaboration

I asked many researchers if they were concerned that they were not saving a snapshot of websites or Apps at the time of their studies. The answer was a resounding “yes!” They recognize that sites and tools change rapidly, but they are unaware of tools or services they can use and/or that their librarians/archivists have solutions.

Clearly there is room for librarians/archivists to conduct more outreach to researchers to inform them about our rich web archive collections and to talk with them about preservation solutions, good data management practices and copyright.

Who knew?

Let me end with sharing one tidbit that really blew my mind. In her research on “Dead Online: Practices of Post-Mortem Digital Interaction,” Paula Kiel presented on the “digital platforms designed to enable post-mortem interactions.” Yes, she was talking about websites where you can send posthumous messages via Facebook and email! For example, https://www.safebeyond.com/, “Life continues when you pass… Ensure your presence – be there when it counts. Leave messages for your loved ones – for FREE!”

RosalieLack

 

By Rosalie Lack, Product Manager, California Digital Library

Being a Small-Time Software Contributor–Non-Developers Included

OpenWayback

At the IIPC General Assembly 2015, we
heard a call for contributors to IIPC relevant software projects (e.g. OpenWayback and Heritrix). We imagined what we could accomplish if every member institution could contribute half a developer’s heritrix-logotime to work on these tools. As individuals though, we are part of the IIPC because of the institutions for which we work. The tasks dealt by our employers come first, not always leaving an abundance of time for external projects. However, there are several ways to contribute on a smaller scale (not just committing code).

How To Help

1. Provide user support for OpenWayback and Heritrix

Join the openwayback-dev list and/or the Heritrix list, and answer questions when you can.

2. Log issues for software problems

github-social-codingAnytime you notice something isn’t working as expected in a piece of software, report the issue. For projects like OpenWayback and Heritrix that are on GitHub, creating an account to enable reporting issues is easy. If you aren’t sure if the problem warrants opening an issue, send a message to the relevant mailing list.

3. Follow issues on the OpenWayback and Heritrix GitHub repositories

Check issue trackers regularly or “Watch” GitHub repositories to receive issue updates via email. If you see an issue for a bug or new feature relevant to your institution, comment on it, even if only to say that it is relevant. This helps the developers prioritize which issues to work on.

watch_github_repo
https://github.com/iipc/openwayback

4. Test release candidates

When a new distribution of OpenWayback is about to be released, the development group sends out emails asking for people to test the release distribution candidates. Verify whether the deployment works in your environment and use cases. Then report back.

5. Contribute to documentation

For any web archiving project, if you find documentation that is lacking or unclear, report it to the maintainers, and if possible, volunteer to fix it.

6. Contribute to code

OpenWayback currently has several open issues for bugs and enhancements. If you find an issue of interest to you and/or your institution, notify others with a comment that you want to work on it. View the contribution guidelines, and start contributing. OpenWayback and Heritrix are happy to get pull requests.

7. Review codeBinary code

When others submit code for potential inclusion into a project’s master code branch, volunteer to review the code and test it by deploying the software with the changes in place to verify everything works as expected.

 8. Join the OpenWayback Developer calls

If you are interested in contributing to OpenWayback, these calls keep you informed on the current state of development. The group is always looking for help with testing release candidates, prioritizing issues, writing documentation, reviewing pull requests, and writing code. Calls take place approximately every three weeks at 4PM London time, there is also a Google Groups list, email the IIPC PCO to join.

9. Solicit development support from your institution

Non-developers have a great role in the development effort. Encourage technical staff you work with to contribute to software projects and help them build time into their schedules for it. If you are not in a position to do this, lobby the people who can grant some of your institution’s developer time to web archiving projects.

What You Get Back

Collaborating on web archiving projects isn’t just about what you contribute. The more you follow mailing lists and issue trackers and the more you work with code and its deployment, the better your institution can utilize the software and keep current on the direction of its development.

If your institution doesn’t use OpenWayback or Heritrix, the above ways of helping apply to many other web archiving software projects. So get involved where you can; you don’t have to fix everything.

lauren_koLauren Ko
Programmer, Digital Libraries Division, UNT Libraries